| Tara Langdale

Sore After Sex? Your Vagina Will Thank You for These 3 Remedies

While sexual intercourse can be a beautiful act, you can be sore after sex. If you're sore during or after sex, the medical term is dyspareunia. The Sexual Advice Association estimates that 8-22% of women experience dyspareunia at one point, as it is one of the most common vaginal issues. (1)

 

For the most part, vaginal pain is normal and goes away in a few days. In other circumstances, the sore vagina may come from a severe medical condition. The treatment for vaginal irritation depends on the cause. In this article, we'll explore the reasons, and then offer three natural remedies for easing the soreness and tightness from an inflamed vagina.

 

Causes of vaginal soreness

 

Lack of lubrication

When you’re sexually aroused, you have a healthy amount of natural lubrication. If you don’t have enough foreplay or are not producing enough lubricant, vaginal dryness may be the cause of pain. Slippery Stuff is an ultra-slick, water-based lubricant recommended by physicians that add a vaginal moisturizer to your sex life.   

 

Tight pelvic floor muscles  

 

Your vagina is a long muscle made up of different parts, including the vulva and pelvic floor. Vaginismus is a medical condition where your vaginal muscles contract. If you have constricted pelvic floor muscles, sexual penetration can become unbearable. One natural solution is to stretch your vagina with a vaginal dilator. 

 

A vaginal dilator is a tube-shaped device that resembles a sex toy but is a medical treatment device commonly used to provide relief for sore vaginal muscles. The Deluxe Neodymium Magnetic Vaginal Dilator Set comes in various sizes to choose the right size for your vagina. 

 

Long and vigorous sex  


If you've had a long night of vigorous penetration, you may have vaginal irritation. A reasonable amount of pain is normal; however, if it's searing or lasts more than a few days, speak to your healthcare advisor. It may be linked to a more pressing concern.

 

Vulvodynia 

Vulvodynia is an unexplained vulvar pain that lasts longer than three months. It can occur before, during, or after sex. The vulva is the area outside of the vaginal opening that includes the genitals. Women describe the pain as burning, searing, stinging, and throbbing.

 

Vaginismus

Vaginismus is the uncontrollable spasms of the vaginal muscles. The contractions of the pelvic muscles can make your vagina after sex to throb and pulsate even more. Many women use the Vaginismus Starter Kit to stretch and strengthen the vaginal muscles. The treatment helps ease the pain and suffering associated with vaginismus.

 

VuVa Starter Kit available at www.vuvatech.com 

 

Hormone changes

Most people don’t realize the importance of balanced hormones. Any change in estrogen may determine how sexually aroused you feel and the reasons your vagina is tender. Women experiencing menopause have low estrogen levels, leading to vaginal atrophy (dryness).

 

Vaginal infections

 

If you have unusual discharge, vaginal itching, or a burning sensation, you may have a vaginal infection.  Common infections include the following:

 

  • bacterial vaginosis 
  • urinary tract infections (UTIs) 
  • genital herpes 
  • yeast infection 
  • pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)  


If you suspect you have a vaginal infection, make an appointment with your doctor.   

 

Bartholin's cyst 

If you have pain during sex, it may come from a Bartholin's cyst (pus-filled sore). Next to the vaginal opening are two glands named after Caspar Bartholin the Younger. First, let's not name women body parts after men, but instead call them vaginal glands responsible for mucus or secretion to make sexual activity more enjoyable. Sometimes they can fill with fluid making sex painful.

 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) 

The Mayo Clinic says that STIs come from sexual contact. Symptoms of an STI include the following: (2)

 

  • strong-smelling vaginal discharge
  • sore vagina during sex
  • high temperature
  • bumps or sores in the vulvar and genital regions
  • swollen groin lymph nodes
  • bleeding
  • pain in the lower abdomen
  • rash

 

Most STIs can be easily treated, but the key is to undergo treatment as early as possible to prevent long term health effects.

 

Allergic reaction to latex or lubricants

Painful sex may come from a latex condom or oil-based lubricant allergic reaction. Your skin may be sensitive to latex and become irritated and inflamed in response. Switch to a different birth control method and try a water-based lubricant to ease the pain.

 

Use a lubricant that works 

Vaginal dryness can come from low estrogen levels, decreased sexual desire, or even taking medications, such as birth control. The lack of vaginal moisturizers may cause you to feel sore after sex. The solution is to use a high-quality lubricant that doesn't irritate the tissue or vaginal muscles. Slippery Stuff Lubricants are proven to infuse vaginal moisturizer in all the necessary places to make your next sexual encounter as pleasant as possible.  



Stretch vaginal muscles with dilators 

One scientifically proven way to prevent soreness is to lengthen and stretch your pelvic floor muscles with vaginal dilators. In a double-blind study using VuVa™ magnetic vaginal dilators vs. placebo dilators, patients treating pelvic pain with VuVa™ dilators reported an 80% reduction in overall pain, compared to the placebo dilators. Strengthening your pelvic muscles helps mitigate a sore vagina after sex. 

 

VuVa Dilators sets are available at www.vuvatech.com. Made in the USA. Ships discreetly for your privacy. 

 

Try ice to ease the pain  

Using an ice pack is a remedy that may reduce pain from a sore vagina. It would be best if you didn't place the ice pack on bare vulvar skin, but rather over cotton underwear. Another option is to sit in a cold bath. Hold the ice pack in place for 5-10 minutes at a time. Doctors don't recommend inserting the ice pack into your vagina.  

If your vagina feels sore, it can have detrimental effects on your well-being and sex life. While some soreness may be normal after sex, if the pain is chronic, it may indicate a serious health concern. The first step is to speak to a health care professional you trust. In the meantime, using a lubricant, vaginal dilator, or ice pack are natural remedies can help.

 

https://sexualadviceassociation.co.uk/pain-during-or-after-sex/
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sexually-transmitted-diseases-stds/symptoms-causes/syc-20351240

 

VuVa Helpful Links:

How do Neodymium Vaginal Dilators work? 

7 Reasons for a Tight Vagina and How to Loosen 

How to use Vaginal Dilators 

How to Relax Vaginal Muscles, Vaginismus & Sex 

Vaginal Stretching - Keeping in Shape with Dilators 

Do Dilators Really Work? Yes, and They can Improve Your Sex Life!

Shop for VuVa Vaginal Dilators

 

Tara Langdale Schmidt is the inventor of the VuVa Dilator Company. She has pelvic floor dysfunction herself and wanted to create a dilator set that is made in America that women can trust. VuVatech has been in business since 2014 and has helped over 40,000 women all over the globe. She patented the Neodymium Vaginal Dilator, that is clinically proven to help with blood flow and nerve pain.